Unsane – Tickets – The Riot Room – Kansas City, MO – July 20th, 2017

Unsane

Unsane

Fashion Week, BUMMER

Thu, July 20, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

The Riot Room

Kansas City, MO

$10.00 - $12.00

This event is 21 and over

Unsane
Unsane
Formed - 1988 in New York.

Noise rock trio of Chris Spencer (The Cutthroats 9), Vincent Signorelli (Swans) and Dave Curran (The Cutthroats 9 & The J.J. Paradise Players Club). The original lineup consisted of Spencer, Pete Shore and drummer Charlie Ondras, who passed away from a drug overdose in 1992.

The video for the song "Scrape" (from their 1995 album Scattered, Smothered & Covered) received a lot of airplay on MTV and became their biggest hit to date.

Note - in order to avoid confusion with the heavy metal band of the same name, they often use the suffix "NYC".
Fashion Week
Fashion Week
Fashion Week is an American rock band that was formed by singer/guitarist Joshua Lozano and Bassist Oscar Rodriguez in Brooklyn, New York in 1987. Fashion Week went through a succession of drummers, the longest-lasting being Carl Eklof, who joined the band in 1990, after the disbanding of DC hardcore legends "Shout".
In the late 1980s Fashion Week established itself as part of the New York noise scene, releasing its first album Clorox for the independent record label Under Pop in 1989. The band eventually came to develop a sound that relied on dynamic contrasts, often between pummeling verses and loud, catchy choruses. After signing to major label David Muffin Records, Fashion Week found unexpected success with "Smells Like Old Spice", the first single from the band's second album Fuhgeddaboudit (1991). Fashion Week's sudden success widely popularized alternative rock as a whole, and as the band's frontman Lozano found himself referred to in the media as the "spokesman of a generation", with Fashion Week being considered the "flagship band" of Generation X. Fashion Week's third studio album In Uterus (1993), challenged the group's audience, featuring an abrasive, less-mainstream sound.
Fashion Week's brief run ended following the death of Josh Lozano in 1994, but various posthumous releases have been issued since, overseen by Rodriguez, Eklof, and Lozano's widow Catherine Lust. Since its debut, the band has sold over 25 million albums in the United States alone, and over 50 million worldwide. Eklof went on to form the highly acclaimed "Food Fighters", and Rodriguez has pursued a career in politics, and wedding crashing.
BUMMER
BUMMER
I just want to scare you, honestly," Matt Perrin says between mouthfuls of food. "When I get up onstage, the whole point of what I want to do is scare people. I want people to look at me and get uncomfortable. I mean, look at me."

Perrin is wearing black, square-frame glasses; a T-shirt printed with grazing cows; and a lime-green baseball cap turned backward over his long, dishwater-blond hair. When he narrows his sharp brown eyes, the 19-year-old guitarist and lead singer for Olathe thrash-rock trio Bummer appears altogether unthreatening. He knows this.

His bandmates know, too. Huddled around a table with Perrin at Grinders, bassist Mike Gustafson, 22, and drummer Tom Williams, 18, are about as unassuming as the basket of fries they're sharing. And yet, since the release of Bummer's four-song Milk EP last October, word of this up-and-coming band's brutal, barbaric sound has spread.

"I feel like people look at us and are like, 'Oh, what's going to happen here?' " Perrin continues. "And if someone's never heard of us before, I want them to be genuinely scared the first time they hear us. Because Mike's just ripping, and Tom's just loud as fuck."

"We turn all our stuff up as loud as it goes and we just fly," Gustafson says. "We didn't try to make it sound so angry. That's just how it came out. I just like super-loud, super-catchy stuff — stuff with hooks that hit hard."

Perrin adds, "We all kind of get it when it comes to that. It's gotta be heavy and catchy, but it has to punch you in the face at the same time."

Milk does come out swinging, and over its swift quarter-hour, the fuming and the venom don't let up. It's the work of a tight unit. Musical sympathies and ambitions are firmly aligned. Perrin and Williams have been friends since high school, and they were dedicated fans of Gustafson's now-defunct band the Resourceful Horse.

"The reason I started playing with them, even though I'm not much older, was because everyone my age was getting way too trashed to play," Gustafson says. "And, of course, that's fun and stuff, but these guys are motivated, and it was nice to play with people who gave a shit. We've all been in different bands, and this is just easy."

Not everything is about pure sonic assault, though. Perrin, who has roots in jazz guitar and doesn't play down his love of J-pop, has enrolled in jazz courses this fall at Kansas City, Kansas, Community College.

"I've been playing jazz since eighth grade," Perrin says. "I've taken a bunch of music-theory classes. I understand scales and keys. It works for us in that Mike is very feel, and I take his feel and I dissect it."

"I taught myself," Gustafson explains. "Usually it takes them a second to figure out what I'm doing because they're like, 'What key is that in?' And they're trying to figure out time signatures and stuff. And I'm just like, 'Just go with it.' I'm a terrible influence."

Another EP is in the works, and for the first time, Bummer is headed to a professional recording space (Weston House Recording). Another first: actual vinyl. But like Milk, the next EP — set for a fall release — will include just four songs. The reasoning?

"We're poor," Gustafson says. His companions give despondent nods.

"But this is the last EP," Williams says. "We thought it'd be cool to do at least one EP that gets physically put out, and then do a full-length after and put it out on vinyl — you know, if the EP goes well on vinyl."

Still, don't expect the LP, which might see a release next winter, to overcompensate with lengthy material. For the most part, Bummer's songs run less than four minutes, and the live shows rarely push past 25.

"There's a lot of bands that play for 30 or 45 minutes, and I'm standing there like, 'Dude, I actually want to leave now,' " Gustafson says. "We usually do a 15- to 20-minute set. We try to get in there, play loud and leave."

"There's an article called 'Six Reasons Your Band Shouldn't Play Longer Than 20 Minutes' [by Drew Ailes, of The Village Voice], and everyone should read it," Perrin says. "If you play more than 20 minutes, you over-satisfy. You want to leave the audience with just enough, and if they dig it, they dig it. If they want you to play more, that sucks. I guess they have to come see you again. That's how it's always been with us."
Venue Information:
The Riot Room
4048 Broadway
Kansas City, MO, 64111
http://www.theriotroom.com/
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